WFIRST

WFIRST Simulations


Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope

WFIRST Instrument Microlensing Tutorial Videos


Introduction

Yossi Shvartzvald and Calen Henderson gave a four-talk tutorial on microlensing as part of IPAC's weekly pizza lunch seminar series. PDFs for those talks are given under the Talks link on the Community Engagement tab above and are repeated here for convenience. This page provides the animations referred to in each talk.



Attribution

All PDFs and videos are attributed. Please contact the author using the links below before disseminating.





Tutorial 1


Animations in Tutorial 1 by Scott Gaudi. The lens is shown in yellow and its Einstein ring in green. The source is shown in red, its two images in blue, and its image paths in gray.


Page 5 of Tutorial 1: Magnification created by a single lens (Scott Gaudi). Click to play.


Page 9 of Tutorial 1: Magnification created by a star+planet lens (Scott Gaudi). The color coding here differs from the other animations and can be interpreted as follows: The binary lens is shown in black, its Einstein ring in green, and its source-crossing caustic shown in red. The source itself is shown in blue and its images are shown in purple. Click to play.


Page 10 of Tutorial 1: Magnification created by a binary lens, for various values of the binary's mass ratio (Scott Gaudi). Click to play.


Page 18 of Tutorial 1: Astrometric displacement created by a single lens (Scott Gaudi). Click to play.




Tutorial 2


Animations in Tutorial 2 by Scott Gaudi. The lens is shown in yellow and its Einstein ring in green. The source is shown in red, its two images in blue, and its image paths in gray. For animations with a binary lens, the secondary's Einstein ring is shown in purple.


Page 4 and 5 of Tutorial 2: Magnification created by a single lens (Scott Gaudi). Click to play.


Page 8 of Tutorial 2: Magnification created by a star+planet lens (Scott Gaudi). The color coding here differs from the other animations and can be interpreted as follows: The binary lens is shown in black, its Einstein ring in green, and its source-crossing caustic shown in red. The source itself is shown in blue and its images are shown in purple. Click to play.


Page 11 of Tutorial 2: Magnification created by a binary lens, for various values of the binary's mass ratio (Scott Gaudi). Click to play.


Page 12 of Tutorial 2: Magnification created by a binary lens, for various values of the binary's separation (Scott Gaudi). Click to play.


Page 13 of Tutorial 2: Magnification created by a binary lens with a mass ratio q=0.001, for various angles of the binary axis relative to the source trajectory (Scott Gaudi). Click to play.




Tutorial 3


Animations in Tutorial 3 by Luís Calçada and Andrzej Udalski.


Page 5 of Tutorial 3: Artist's rendition of a star+planet lens (Luís Calçada, ESO).


Page 6 of Tutorial 3: Animation of an actual microlensing event in which a K dwarf + giant planet lensed a background G star (Andrzej Udalski, OGLE collaboration). Click to play.



Tutorial 4


Animations in Tutorial 4 by Calen Henderson and Luís Calçada.


Page 3 of Tutorial 4: Artist's rendition of a star+planet lens (Luís Calçada, ESO).

The four animated GIFs below are the results of simulations to help visualize and make intuitive the parallax effect that will be measured during the microlensing survey of Campaign 9 of Kepler's extended K2 mission (K2C9). To learn more about the K2C9 endeavor, please read the white paper, which can be found here.

Each animated GIF shows the evolution of certain parameters of K2C9 as a function of time, with a step size of one day per panel. The Solar System bodies in all cases are the Sun (yellow), the Earth (purple), Kepler (blue), and Spitzer (red), which will observe in tandem with Kepler during the last ~2 weeks of C9.

To request permission to use any of these parallax visualizations, point out an error, or make a general comment, please contact Calen B. Henderson (the first author of the above paper and the creator of the pdfs and gifs) by requesting the email address using the Contact link at the top of the page.


Page 9 of Tutorial 4: Observer orbital motion as seen from above the Solar System (Calen Henderson). Click to play.


Page 10 of Tutorial 4: Observer orbital motion as seen from above the Solar System in the left pane, and observer orbital motion as seen from the K2C9 superstamp in the right pane (Calen Henderson). Click to play.


Page 11 of Tutorial 4: Observer orbital motion as viewed from the K2C9 superstamp, scaled to the physical size of the Einstein Ring for a typical microlensing event (Calen Henderson). Click to play.


Page 12 of Tutorial 4: Four-panel plot showing the animations from above plus a new panel (lower right) showing the corresponding light curves for a typical microlensing event as seen from the Earth, Kepler, and Spitzer (Calen Henderson). Click to play.